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WorldPride

WorldPride, licensed by InterPride and organized by one of its members, is an event that promotes lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT pride) issues on an international level through parades, festivals and other cultural activities. The event was founded by Paul Stenson. The inaugural WorldPride was held in Rome in 2000. The second WorldPride was awarded to Jerusalem in 2006. WorldPride 2012 was awarded to London and coincides with the 19th Annual Europride. The selection of WorldPride 2014 was chosen on October 18, 2009; the two candidates were Toronto and Stockholm, with Toronto winning on the second round of voting. The host cities are selected by InterPride, an international association of pride coordinators, at its annual general meeting.

At the 16th annual conference of InterPride, held in October 1997 in New York City, InterPride’s membership voted to establish the “WorldPride” title and awarded it to the city of Rome, Italy during July 1 to July 9, 2000. The event was put on by the Italian gay rights group Mario Mieli along with InterPride.

Rome officials had promised to put up US$200,000 for the event, however bowing to ferocious opposition from the Vatican and conservative politicians, Rome’s leftist mayor, Francesco Rutelli, on May 30, 2000 withdrew logistical and monetary support. Hours after his announcement, Rutelli mostly reversed himself in response to harsh criticism from the left. He restored the funding and promised to help with permits, but declined to back down on a demand that organizers remove the city logo from promotional materials. The event was staunchly opposed by Pope John Paul II and seen as an infringement on the numerous Catholic pilgrims visiting Rome for the Catholic Church’s Great Jubilee. Pope John Paul II addressed crowds in St. Peter’s Square during WorldPride 2000 stating, in regards to the event, that it was an “offence to the Christian values of a city that is so dear to the hearts of Catholics across the world.”

The organisers claimed 250,000 people joined in the march to the Colosseum and the Circus Maximus, two of Rome’s most famous ancient sites. It was one of the biggest crowds to gather in Rome for decades. Among the scheduled events were conferences, a fashion show, a large parade, a leather dance, and a concert featuring Gloria Gaynor, The Village People, RuPaul and Geri Halliwell.

The 22nd annual conference of InterPride, held in October 2003 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada with over 150 delegates from 51 cities from around the world in attendance, voted to accept the bid of the Jerusalem Open House to host WorldPride 2006 in the Holy City.

The first attempt to hold WorldPride in Jerusalem was in 2005, however it was postponed until 2006 because of tensions arising from Israel’s withdrawal from the Gaza Strip. It was called “Love Without Borders” as a nod to the many barriers within Israel, and for gays and lesbians in other ways. World Pride was a key project of Jerusalem’s Open House, the city’s gay community centre. From the planned starting point of the march on Ben Yehuda Street, participants could see an eight-metre (25-foot) concrete wall, called by Israel the “separation barrier” but known by some as the Apartheid (or Segregation) Wall.

After Jerusalem was selected as the WorldPride 2006 City, the city of Tel Aviv announced that it was cancelling its own annual Pride Weekend in 2006 to make sure that more Israelis attended the main march. As WorldPride started in 2006, the main parade was scheduled for August 6, but was strongly opposed by Israeli religious leaders from the outset. However, due to the 2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict, Jerusalem’s government cancelled the march, saying there were not enough soldiers to protect marchers. A week of events took place as scheduled and included five conferences, a film festival, exhibitions, and literary and political events. The parade was cancelled but the Jerusalem Open House announced that it would hold a parade on November 10 after reaching an agreement with the police and the municipality

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The 27th annual conference of InterPride, held in October 2008 in Vancouver, Canada, voted to accept the bid of Pride London to host WorldPride 2012 in the capital of the United Kingdom just ahead of the London Olympic and Paralympic Games and during the anticipated year-long celebrations of Queen Elizabeth II’s Diamond Jubilee. Pride London planned a parade with floats, a large performance area in Trafalgar Square with street parties in Golden Square and Soho.

However, London’s World Pride event was significantly “scaled back” at an emergency all-agencies meeting on 27 June 2012, nine days before the event was due to take place and after the festival fortnight had started. Pride London organisers had failed to secure the funds necessary for contractors of key areas of the work, and they announced that all activities were being cut or cancelled. The London Evening Standard reported that four contractors from the previous year’s Pride event were owed £65,000 in unpaid debts, though this has been denied by Pride London. Consequently, the entertainment and stages were all cut, and licence applications for street parties in Soho withdrawn. Instead, the event plans included a Pride Walk (without floats or vehicles), and a scaled-back rally in Trafalgar Square. On 5 July, the Metropolitan Police issued a licence regulations notice to all venues in Soho, reminding them that Pride London had no licence for street events in the Soho area, and therefore venues should treat WorldPride as “any normal day”.

Peter Tatchell and former Pride London Associate Director James-J Walsh in an article for PinkNews criticised the management of Pride London’s management of World Pride. Tatchell said “Whatever the rights and wrongs, this scaling down of WorldPride is a huge embarrassment for London and for our LGBT community. We promised LGBT people world-wide a fabulous, spectacular event. It now looks like WorldPride in London will go down in history as a damp squib. We’re not only letting down LGBT people in Britain, we’re also betraying the trust and confidence of LGBT people world-wide. This is an absolute disaster.” Walsh added “This will mar the work of Pride London for years to come. Pride London has lost the focus of being an LGBT campaigning organisation, instead focusing on partying rather than politics, which is what the community needs when legislation around equal marriage and LGBT rights are still to be won both in the UK and around the world.”

Pride Toronto, in partnership with the city’s tourism agency, Tourism Toronto, submitted a bid to host WorldPride 2014 in Toronto from June 20 to June 29, 2014. The 28th annual conference of InterPride, held in October 2009 in St. Petersburg healthy water bottles bpa free, Florida, United States, voted to accept the bid of Pride Toronto to host WorldPride 2014 for the first time in North America. In the first round of voting Toronto won 77 votes to Stockholm’s 61 gym fanny pack. In the second round of voting Stockholm was eliminated and Toronto won 78% of the vote, fulfilling the 2/3 majority needed to finalize the selection process.

WorldPride 2014 festivities included an opening ceremony at Nathan Phillips Square featuring concert performances by Melissa Etheridge, Deborah Cox, Steve Grand and Tom Robinson, an international human rights conference whose attendees included Jóhanna Sigurðardóttir, Frank Mugisha and Edie Windsor, a gala and awards event freezing water bottles, a variety of networking and social events including Canada Day and American Independence Day celebrations and an exhibition commemorating the 45th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. Three marches occurred over the last three days of the ten-day celebration: the Trans march, the Dyke march, and the WorldPride Parade. Of these marches, the Trans and Dyke marches were more political, while the WorldPride Parade was more celebratory and included floats, musical acts, and dancers. All three marches were the longest of their kind in Canadian history. Over 12,000 people registered to march in the WorldPride parade and over 280 floats took part in the march. The parade lasted over five hours, marking it as one of the longest parades in Toronto’s history. The parade’s grand marshal was Brent Hawkes, the pastor of the Metropolitan Community Church of Toronto, and Georgian activist Anna Rekhviashvili served as international grand marshal.

There were many free public stages throughout Toronto’s Church and Wellesley neighbourhood, featuring drag queen and king shows, burlesque shows, cultural performances, and musical acts including Carly Rae Jepsen, Peaches, Against Me!, Hercules and Love Affair, Chely Wright, Pansy Division, Lydia Lunch, The Nylons, k.d. lang, Carole Pope, Parachute Club, Dragonette and The Cliks. PFLAG sponsored a Pride flag, mounted on a flagpole atop the Churchmouse and Firkin pub, which automatically raised or lowered itself based on the volume of positive or negative commentary about LGBT issues on Twitter, and promoted the hashtag #raisethepride to attendees wishing to help raise the flag.

The event’s slogan was “Rise Up”. Parachute Club, whose 1983 single “Rise Up” has long been considered a Canadian gay anthem, released a contemporary remix of the song a week before the festivities.

The closing ceremony, held at Yonge-Dundas Square following the parade, featured performances by Tegan and Sara, Robin S, CeCe Peniston, Rich Aucoin, God-Des and She and Hunter Valentine.

When estimating the potential economic impact of WorldPride for Toronto, Pride Toronto officials said that Pride Week 2009 drew an estimated one million people to Toronto and contributed C$136 million to the city’s economy, and stated that they expected WorldPride to be about five times bigger. Results showed that WorldPride brought in C$791 million, nearly six times the 2009 figure.

In October 2012, InterPride’s membership voted at its annual conference in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, to award WorldPride 2017 to the city of Madrid, Spain. The other candidate cities to host the event in 2017 were Berlin and Sydney, but Madrid won unanimously in the voting of more than 80 delegations from around the world.

This celebration in Madrid coincided in time with the 24th Europride, which was hosted for the second time in the Spanish capital (the first one was in 2007). It took place from June 23 to 2 July 2017. The event’s slogan was “Whoever you love, Madrid loves you!”, and the song chosen as the anthem was “¿A quién le importa?” by Alaska y Dinarama, which was specially adapted for the event with the collaboration of several Spanish popular singers among the LGBT community, including Fangoria – the band of two of the three former members of Alaska y Dinarama –.

WorldPride Madrid 2017 also coincided with two key anniversaries in the history of the LGBT community in Madrid and Spain: the 40th anniversary of the first demonstration in Spain in support of the rights of LGTB people – which took place in Barcelona in 1977 – and the 25th anniversary of the foundation of the State Federation of Lesbians, Gays, Transsexuals and Bisexuals (FELGTB, from Federación Estatal de Lesbianas, Gays, Transexuales y Bisexuales).

The opening ceremony of the event took place at the Calderón Theatre on Friday, June 23, 2017. Few days later, on Monday, June 26, the Madrid Summit, the International Conference on Human Rights, was inaugurated at the Autonomous University of Madrid. Several cultural events took place in the subsequent days, including the traditional and massive demonstration on July 1, with up to 52 carriages going all over the 2 kilometers between Atocha (Plaza del Emperador Carlos V) and Plaza de Colón. The WorldPride closing ceremony took place on July 2 at Puerta de Alcalá, giving the baton to New York City for the celebration of WorldPride 2019.

On October 18, 2015, InterPride accepted a bid from Heritage of Pride to host WorldPride 2019 in New York City. The event will be held in conjunction with Stonewall 50, a celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall uprising of June 28, 1969, which occurred in New York’s Greenwich Village neighborhood and is widely considered the start of the modern fight for LGBT rights in the United States.

Annapolis

Annapolis er hovedstaden i den amerikanske delstaten Maryland, og hovedsete i Anne Arundel County. Annapolis har 36 217 innbyggere (2004), og er en del av metropolområdet Baltimore-Washington. Byen ligger ved Chesapeake Bay ved utløpet av elven Severn. Byen er den delstatshovedstad som ligger nærmest den nasjonale hovedstad Washington D

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Allerede i 1649 grunnla britiske nybyggere fra Virginia en havn omtrent på dette sted. De var puritanere som var blitt fordrevet fra Virginia. Etter å ha forlagt byen fra den nordre elvebredd og til den søndre, og forsøkt seg frem til et passende bynavn (først «Town at Proctor’s», så «Town at the Severn»), ble det til slutt Anne Arundel’s Towne (etter hustruen til lord Baltimore som døde kort tid etter). Kortformen Arundel Town var også i bruk.

Byen ble svært velstående på grunn av slavehandelen og tobakkshandelen.

I 1704 fikk den sitt nåværende navn da guvernør Francis Nicholson flyttet hovedstaden for den unge kolonien Maryland fra St. Mary’s City og hit. Navneskiftet var en hyllest til den britiske prinsesse og tronfølger Anne. Stavelsen -polis, fra gresk

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Etter den amerikanske uavhengighetskrig var Annapolis i ni måneder (fra 26. november 1783 til 19. august 1784) hovedstad for alle de forente stater ettersom Kongressen holdt til i byen i denne perioden.

Celebrity Skin

Celebrity Skin is the third studio album by American alternative rock band Hole, released worldwide on September 8, 1998 on Geffen Records and one day later in the United States on DGC Records. Hole intended the record to diverge significantly from their previous noise and grunge-influenced sound as featured on Pretty on the Inside (1991) and Live Through This (1994). The band hired producer Michael Beinhorn to record Celebrity Skin over a nine-month period that included the band recording in California, New York and the United Kingdom.

The album was the band’s first studio release to feature bassist Melissa Auf der Maur following the death of former bassist Kristen Pfaff in June 1994. Unlike the material on the band’s previous albums, the songs on Celebrity Skin were composed by a number of musicians instead of solely frontwoman Courtney Love and lead guitarist Eric Erlandson. The Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan contributed largely to the album’s writing process and others, including Auf der Maur’s former bandmate Jordon Zadorozny, contributed to its composition. Love named the album and its title track after a poem she had written, which was heavily influenced by T.S. Eliot’s “The Wasteland”.

Though credited, drummer Patty Schemel did not actually play drums on this album, and was replaced with session drummer Deen Castronovo at the suggestion of producer Beinhorn. This issue created a rift between Schemel and the band, resulting in her dropping out of the tour and parting ways with the group. Celebrity Skin was the original band’s last album before their disbandment in 2002.

Celebrity Skin was Hole’s most commercially successful album. To date, it has sold over 1,400,000 copies in the United States alone, has been certified as platinum in Australia, Canada and the United States and garnered Hole a number one hit single on the Modern Rock Tracks chart with the title track, “Celebrity Skin”. Critical reaction to the album was largely positive and the album was listed on a number of publications’ year-end lists in 1998. The album was named the 265th greatest album of all time by a 2013 poll by NME magazine and was featured in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.

In September 1995, Hole completed the final leg of their year-long of tour in promotion for their second studio album, Live Through This (1994). Despite remaining unproductive in the months following the tour, the members of Hole began working on individual projects. Frontwoman Courtney Love was cast as Althea Flynt in the The People vs. Larry Flynt alongside Woody Harrelson

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, lead guitarist Eric Erlandson collaborated with Rodney Bingenheimer and Thurston Moore in a short-lived project Rodney & the Tube Tops, bassist Melissa Auf der Maur recorded Ric Ocasek’s album Troublizing (1997), and drummer Patty Schemel was a guest musician with The Lemonheads on the tribute album Schoolhouse Rock! Rocks.

Following Love’s promotion of The People vs. Larry Flynt, the band reunited to write new material for Celebrity Skin. According to Love, the embryonic versions of the songs “weren’t very good” and “not written well.” However, the songs developed following the band’s relocation to several parts of the United States, including Nashville, Memphis, Tennessee and New Orleans. During their time in New Orleans, the band recorded a number of demos, including an early version of “Awful” and songs which later developed in to “Dying” and “Hit So Hard”. Despite reports, these sessions did not result in the recording of a complete album and the master tapes were not stolen on an airplane. Erlandson debunked these claims in 2002. The writing process was completed in under a year and the band went through “fruitless attempts” at finalizing the songs before the band were satisfied enough to enter the studio.

The band entered Conway Recording Studios in Los Angeles in April 1997 to begin the recording sessions of the album. The original plan was to have Billy Corgan as executive producer, who was a second choice after Brian Eno, however, Corgan did not initially participate in, or contribute to the recording process. Michael Beinhorn was hired as head of production instead. Recording sessions for the album were spread out over the course of eight to nine months in various locations. The majority of the album was recorded at Conway Recording Studios, however, additional recording was done at Record Plant West in Los Angeles and Olympic Studios in London, United Kingdom. The final recording sessions were completed at Quad Studios in early 1998. These sessions were also video-taped by a friend of the band, as noted in an October 1998 article in Spin magazine.

According to Love, her vision for the album was to “deconstruct the California sound” in the L.A. tradition of bands like The Doors, The Beach Boys and The Byrds, but she was struggling with the composition of the record and felt like she was “in a rut”. After sending early recordings of the songs to Billy Corgan, Corgan joined the band in the studio for a total of twelve days. Love compared Corgan’s presence in the studio to “a math teacher who wouldn’t give you the answers but was making you solve the problems yourself”, and stated that he had her study key changes as well as melodies and phrasing from songs by Frank Sinatra and The Beatles.

What [Billy’s] great at for me— what he did for me has nothing to do with Eric and Melissa. It has to do with me. I was in a rut, I could not even get out of bed. I didn’t want to make this record, I didn’t want do anything. I was dull, my blade was not sharp, and he’s probably one of the only people on the planet that can challenge me. My craft was at this place and Eric and Melissa and Patty couldn’t help me; they all have brilliance and craft, but because I’m in a band within a family context with them, they weren’t outsiders enough to really just help me.

According to Erlandson, who discussed the recording sessions online in 2005, Love was allegedly “not caring about” playing her instrument during the sessions, focusing only on singing and song-writing. He also confirmed Corgan’s involvement in the recording process, and revealed he played bass on “Hit So Hard” and the outtake “Be a Man”. Earlier in 2002, Love revealed on the band’s official online forum, that Corgan also played bass on “Petals” as Melissa Auf der Maur was unable to play it.

A wide variety of guitars, effect pedals and equipment were used during the recording of Celebrity Skin. Love used Fender tube amplifiers, Matchless amps, Ampeg amps and a Randall Commander that belonged to Love’s late husband Kurt Cobain. Love’s primary guitars during the sessions were her custom Fender Vista Venus and a Chet Atkins Gretsch. Erlandson’s guitar set-up was much more complex, using numerous guitars through different effects in a set-up he arranged with Beinhorn. He used three of his Veleno guitars that were also used to record Live Through This, a 1968 Fender Telecaster and “numerous other guitars”. Each signal from each guitar was split to two separate channels. One channel included a Tech 21 SansAmp, a collection of vintage analog synthesizers, including a Serge modular system, an ARP 2600 and a Moog modular system with a Boda frequency shifter. The other side included a Watkins Dominator, which “provided tons of low end”, and generators that were later used during the production process.

Patty Schemel, despite being credited as a member of the band and the album’s drummer in the liner notes, did not play drums on the album and was instead replaced with a session drummer, Deen Castronovo. Initially, Love blamed Schemel’s drug addiction as the cause of her absence, however, Schemel insisted it was due to “musical differences”. The differences cited by Schemel were between her and Beinhorn. She claimed that Beinhorn was “totally psyching [her] out in the studio” and after a meeting with the band, Beinhorn brought in session drummer Deen Castronovo, to which she felt “betrayed by the band”.

According to Chris Whitemeyer, a sound technician working on the record, Beinhorn would request take after take of Schemel’s drum parts, and would dim the volume in the sound booth and read the newspaper while she played. Whitemeyer stated that Schemel was drumming in the studio eight hours a day for over two weeks, and that Beinhorn “wanted Patty to give up”. After Schemel completed over two weeks of recording, Beinhorn brought Love into the studio and had her listen to loops of Schemel’s “weakest playing”, and then suggested Castronovo as an alternative. Whitemeyer also stated that Castronovo had been asked by Beinhorn to enter the studio before Love or any of the other band members heard Schemel’s drum tracks, and that Beinhorn “had it all planned out” early on.

The event resulted in Schemel leaving the studio and requesting a settlement and breaking off ties with the band. Several months later, Schemel participated in the promotional photo shoot for the album, but refused to tour with the band. In 2002, Love admitted in an interview with Carrie Fisher to having Schemel replaced on the album:

Patty, who’s been my drummer for years and years and years, she had like a two-year living-in-a-tent crack existence downtown. I did this very classic rock horrible thing where I let the producer tell me that she sucked, let him play me a tape— this is so, like, out of the rock bad cliche book— let him play me a tape of her sounding the worst, that he had basically cobbled together. He’d kept a guy on retainer the whole time […] I ruined her life for two years because I kicked her out of the band for the duration of the record.

In later years, Schemel and other band mates resolved the issue and have remained friends. At a screening of Schemel’s documentary Hit So Hard at New York’s Museum of Modern Art in 2011, Love later called Beinhorn “a Nazi”.

In spite of the extreme measures undertaken by Hole’s label, DGC Records, to prevent the album from leaking (including an “iron clad” agreement that prohibited music journalists who received advance copies from allowing anyone else to hear or record the album), the first single from the album, “Celebrity Skin”, was leaked three weeks before its intended release dates and played “nearly a dozen times” on New York radio station WXRK (92.3 FM) and their Los Angeles-based sister station, KROQ-FM (106.7 FM), on the weekend of July 31 to August 2, 1998. DGC spokesperson Jim Merlis denied that the leak originated from them and issued WXRK a cease and desist order on August 3. Nevertheless, San Francisco radio station Live 105 (105.3 FM) played the single again the following weekend.

Upon its release, Celebrity Skin received positive critical acclaim. AllMusic editor Stephen Thomas Erlewine said the album was “a glaze of shiny guitars and hazy melodies, all intended to evoke the heyday of Californian pop in the late ’70s,” awarding the album four stars out of five. Former Village Voice and Pazz and Jop writer Robert Christgau rated it two out of three stars, an “honorable mention”, noted that Love was “better punk than actress, better actress than popster” and listed the title track and “Awful” as the album’s notable songs. Robert Cherry of the Alternative Press described Celebrity Skins sound as “meticulously orchestrated guitars, multilayered vocal harmonies, quantized drums and sheeny studio magic” and said the songs “hit nerve centers like a thousand AM classics.” The Austin Chronicles Marc Savlov awarded the album four out of five and referred to the album as “end of the summer crunch-pop from the most enigmatic woman around” but criticized Love’s “painful, quasi-Freudian vein” and “Michael Beinhorn’s slick, SoCal production.” Tom Edwards of Drowned in Sound gave the album an 8/10 rating and a mixed review, referring to “Awful” as “gorgeous, pure blues” and “Hit So Hard” as “the best song about love since ‘Retard Girl’,” but concluding that “it’s a weak record full of empty music either way.” Entertainment Weekly reviewer David Browne said “the music is sleeker and more taut than anything Hole have done” in his B+ review. The Los Angeles Times awarded the album a full four star rating, with reviewer Robert Hilburn calling the album “one wild emotional ride” and “a far more complex work than the invigorating, mainstream coating would lead you to believe.” Steve Sutherland of NME mentioned that “the first thing you think when Celebrity Skin smacks you in the nose is that you may never need to hear a rock ‘n’ roll record ever again,” compared the album’s sound to Fleetwood Mac and rated the album 8/10. Rolling Stone awarded the album four out of five stars and described it as “sprung, flung and fun, high-impact

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, rock-fueled pop” and noted that “it teems with sonic knockouts that make you see all sorts of stars and is accessible

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, fiery and intimate – often at the same time,” while Spin reviewer Joshua Clover rated the album 9/10 and referred to the album as “a record filled with quotation and reference, backtalk and revision” and said “there are too many great songs, and this is a magnificent pop record.” Several publications also listed Celebrity Skin in year-end periodical lists, including Time, who listed the album at number 9 on its Best of 1998 Music list, Spin, who listed the album at number 11 on its Top 20 Albums of the Year list, and The Village Voice, who listed the album at number 14 in the Pazz and Jop Critics’ Poll.

Celebrity Skin was a commercial success, charting in 13 countries worldwide within a week of its release. In the United States, the album debuted at number 9 on the Billboard 200 with sales of 86,000 copies in its first week. The album was certified Gold by the RIAA on October 13, 1998 and later certified Platinum on December 21, with sales of over 1 million copies. As of 2010, the album has sold nearly 2 million copies worldwide; 1.4 million copies in the United States and 124,221 copies in the United Kingdom. The album has also been certified Platinum in Canada with sales of over 100,000 copies and two times Platinum in Australia with sales of over 140,000 copies.

The album received three nominations at the 41st Grammy Awards in 1999: Best Rock Album, Best Rock Song, and Best Rock Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group. “Malibu” later received a Grammy nomination at the 42nd Grammy Awards in 2000 for Best Rock Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group. and its music video, and the director Martin Coppen, was also nominated for Best Cinematography at the 1999 MTV Video Music Awards. In 2002, the music video for “Malibu”, and its cinematographer, won the 2002 Lifetime Achievement Award in Cinematography from the Music Video Production Association.

^shipments figures based on certification alone